Page created: January 12, 2005
by Nellieanna H. Hay
featuring "True Love" ~
written by Cole Porter
for musical High Society -
as sung by Bing Crosby & Grace Kelly
in the 1950s movie -


TRUE LOVE
Performed by BING CROSBY and GRACE KELLY

(as DEXTER and TRACY):
Sun-tanned, Wind-blown
Honeymooners at last alone.
Feeling far above par.
Oh, how lucky we are!
While . . .

I give to you and you give to me,
True love, true love.
So on and on it'll always be,
True love, true love.
For you and I
Have a guardian angel on high,
With nothin' to do.
But to give to you and to give to me,
Love forever true.

For you and I
Have a guardian angel on high,
With nothin' to do.
But to give to you and to give to me,
Love forever true.
Love forever true.


The 1956 movie, High Society, was a remake of a 1940 romantic comedy The Philadelphia Story, starring Cary Grant as C.K. Dexter-Haven, Katharine Hepburn as Tracy Lord, and James Stewart as Mike Connor. High Society supplanted The Philadelphia Story's wordiness with top-notch musical numbers from Cole Porter, making it a better-paced movie.

High Society changed the setting to Newport, Rhode Island, where, amidst the filthy rich, we meet Tracy Lord (Grace Kelly), quintessential ice goddess. She's drop-dead gorgeous, haughty, condescending, and ruthlessly discards men who don't measure up to her expectations, from her philandering Dad to her ex-husband, composer C.K. Dexter-Haven (Bing Crosby). She's about to embark upon a second marriage to an irreproachable but dull George Kittredge (John Lund. Covering the wedding is ace gossip reporter, Mike Connor (Frank Sinatra), accompanied by his girl Friday (Celeste Holm).

The pre-wedding preparations run into roadblocks. Dexter loves Tracy and is committed to stopping the ceremony, with the help of his friend, jazz great Louis Armstrong. To further complicate the plot, Mike and Tracy have a brief romantic fling.

Even now, in the 21st century, there's still a lot to like about High Society. The romantic elements are refreshingly heartfelt, but they don't become overdone or corny. In fact, the film's dialogue is delightful, thus proving that love and lovers are timeless. (The best exchange is without a doubt the one between Tracy and Mike as they zip around Newport in her car, bantering about wealth, idleness, and class differences.)

The chief pleasures of High Society are the performances, which bring life and vitality to the characters, and the music, which makes this movie one that retains its appeal. The score boasts many delightful tunes with great lyrics.

Crosby, Sinatra, Kelly, and Armstrong make the most out of their numbers. Sinatra and Crosby have a fine, lively duet called "Well, Did You Evah?" while Crosby and Kelly share the spotlight for this lightly romantic "True Love." Armstrong gets the film off to a fine start with "High Society," a calypso song whose lyrics lay out the background of the story that is about to unfold, and "many, many more", as the saying goes.

The real scene-stealer is the luminous Grace Kelly, in her last film role (the engagement ring Tracy wears in High Society is actually the engagement ring given to the actress by Prince Ranier).

High Society is one of the great film musicals of the 1950s, when musicals were full entertainment packages, rather than shallow attempts to sell soundtracks. High Society has a voice, a heart and a soul.



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2005 - Created & Copyrighted by Nellieanna H. Hay